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CSPAN
Jul 3, 2011 9:30pm EDT
. in the south, there is a lot of open combat. this is the headquarters of the taliban. >> in the east the violence depends on where you are. these to have strong relationships with kabul, with a lot of traffic. today, these are what i call, bombing galleries, where the coalition troops and a large coalition presence is trying very hard to like this town in order to protect this. but every step that they take, they are threatened. thousands every year, that are killing hundreds of native troops, and many times the number of afghans. as we move closer to the border, and you had se, the threat will change. this is not so much ied's because there is less vehicle traffic. the coalition soldiers and the taliban will move on foot. the coalition has helicopters, but then they are back to walking around on foot. this is a lot less useful and they are optimized for -- in places like this you see more small arms fire, lots of snipers. this looks like a street battle in world war two, on a smaller scale. people throwing grenades and things like this. on the coalition side, there is a great air po
CSPAN
Jul 26, 2011 7:00am EDT
at these countries, that they are not radicals connected to terrorists like al qaeda or the taliban, or the muslim brotherhood. in egypt, for instance, right now, and tunisia and other countries in the middle east, we do not know who is going to be in charge. we are talking about supporting various governments, when they have an election. until we see what happens in the elections, we should not be giving money to those who are sympathetic in working with terrorist organizations in do not have our interests at stake. or want to destroy the state of israel. so, right now, for instance, in egypt the barrier between egypt and gaza has been broken down, in effect. hamas, in control of gaza right now, can bring in more weapons to attack israel. a signal that really bothers me, because it indicates to the muslim but -- brotherhood that they have more influence than people realize. in the past they have asked for the destruction of israel. and host: the muslim brotherhood is not considered a terrorist group. guest: if you look at their history, they have been committed to changes in the middle east, incl
FOX News
Jul 9, 2011 4:00pm EDT
the next year. he says he hopes to drive the taliban into peace talks over that period. he also said he was upbeat about prospects of defeating al-qaeda if they can capture and kill remaining leaders. >> i would say somewhere around 10 to 20 key leaders, between pakistan, yemen, so somalia and north africa, if we can go after them, i think we really can strategically defeat al-qaeda. >> he also said the targeting of leaders such as the al-qaeda chief ayman al-zawahri continues to limit their ability to conduct attacks. he may just go well over the border in pakistan's northwest in tribal areas. he also admits there was some skepticism about what help they are getting from pakistan after they killed osama bin laden last month. he did say that in the past pakistan has helped them track down some of the al-qaeda leadership. >> heather: thank you very much, david piper streaming live from afghanistan. >> gregg: are we really in reach of defeating al-qaeda? is the road to victory as simply as taking out the top 20 leaders. joining me now is senior advisor and principal of international advis
CSPAN
Jul 6, 2011 1:00pm EDT
. >> general, chuck hoss kinson from politico. you said before that with the problem of infiltration of taliban into afghan security forces, as the afghans take over more and more responsibility that there might be a need to accept a greater risk in terms of dealing with that problem. how would you assess the possibility of that risk going forward now and what steps would you be taking to mitigate it? >> the mitigation of that risk is being done by a combination of counterintelligence effort, by the coalition forces and most importantly the afghan national security forces are taking it head on. it's an issue of leadership and knowing your people and the afghan leadership and chain of command is taking that on and i believe we're moving in the right direction with that risk. >> i want to thing che -- change the subject real quick work the upcoming transition in the army, i was wondering if you could talk a little bit about your interactions with general odeer noah and your thoughts on his leadership for the army going forward. >> i've had just one interact with general odierno at a utility confe
CSPAN
Jul 9, 2011 11:00pm EDT
service, the isi come has close ties to the former current and the velte fund and start the taliban back in afghanistan and they started the ltte. the people would give the attacks in india as a counterweight to the military power. all those groups of operational connections now and the experts would be and are inclined to plan operations against the west both at home and abroad, so the question becomes then how vulnerable is the pakistani arsenal and how much would someone get a nuclear complex there's several ways. you could of the clandestine sale of materials which a.q., the father of the program for a number of years you could have a rogue officer take over the nuclear installation work you could have my scenario where the transit from the secured facilities to the front lines and the nuclear alert because that's where it's most vulnerable. so you have a combination of weapons, the country which is hostile, the security service which has ties to the jihadists and a lot of them have been indulged by the establishment and the security, and you have something that is a worry and i woul
CSPAN
Jul 7, 2011 1:00pm EDT
democracy. with the american acquiescence and saudi financeing, the pakistani government created the taliban as islamabad's van guard for the conquest of afghanistan. in the process they set in place a fundamentalist antiwestern radical terrorist state. let's note that even after 9/11, after 3,000 of our citizens had been slaughtered, the i.s.i. continued to covertly support radical islamic terrorists and they are still engaged in such hostile acts, even as american lives are being lost even today. in 2010 the london school of economics published a report that found agents of the i.s.i., this is 2010, long after 9/11, were, quote, funding and training the afghan taliban, end of quote. and the top things are -- to top this off, there is substantial reporting that has been done that suggests that pakistani diplomats are lobbying the afghanistan government -- afghan government leaders suggesting that they dump the united states and turn to china for a partnership and re-- in reconstruction. this isn't shame on them, this is shame on us. washington may be able to coerce and bribe islamabad into
FOX News
Jul 4, 2011 6:00am EDT
a number of problems a number of years ago, rising taliban. are we putting those remaining troops at risk? are we going to see higher casualty counts as a result? >> it's likely. the commanders still have the mission to win and they will go about that task as we speak. they're looking at all the options and there are creatives ways they can do that. but with those kind of numbers leaving, they are frankly going to ask our troops to do more with less. that will drive up casualties as a result of this. i just wonder if that was ever given a consideration when these options were being looked at and the commanders' recommendations were being ignored. >> may not send the right message to our troops, but you would like to send a special message to our troops on this fourth of july. what is that? >> thanks for that opportunity. we're the oldest democracy in the world and the rest of the world looks to us as a model for freedom and democracy. this has come at some sacrifice to us and the american people to preserve our liberties and our values. our troops out there today are doing that very thing
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7